Ford Explorers Continue to Have Carbon Monoxide Problems

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Ford Explorers Continue to Have Carbon Monoxide Problems

Did Ford Fail to Fix Exhaust Defect in 1.3M SUVs?

The Center for Auto Safety is once again urging Michigan-based Ford Motor Co. to recall 1.3 million of its Explorer SUVs due to continued consumer complaints of carbon monoxide (CO) leaks. On Monday, July 2, the group shared an official letter of notice to Ford alerting them of ongoing concerns related to exhaust leaking into the cabin of the SUVs, and urging a formal voluntary recall for the second time in two years. An investigation first led by the Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) started up in October 2017, when complaints from more than 1,300 Explorer operators and owners came from fear of sensing toxic CO exposures inside their vehicles.

The automaker says it addressed the 2017 concerns by offering free repairs to reprogram the air conditioner, replace liftgate drain valves and inspect the sealing of the vehicle for any alerted Explorer users. The voluntary repairs covered about 1.3 million Explorers with model years 2011 through 2017 but did not end with a recall. Since the fixes, the Center for Auto Safety says an additional 44 new consumer complaints have been noted and that “Ford has failed to fix the problem.” Ford responded by saying that the models in question are safe and that an internal investigation “has not found carbon monoxide levels that exceed what people are exposed to every day.”

Jason Levine, the auto safety advocacy group’s executive director, said in a news release, “With all due respect to the efforts undertaken by Ford, and NHTSA, over these last two years, the continued complaints and corresponding reports of incidents and injuries demonstrate the problem of Carbon Monoxide exposure inside Ford Explorers has not been resolved.”

What to Do If You Experience Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Symptoms

CO is a silent, odorless and deadly poison. The fumes can be found any time a motor vehicle, such as Ford SUVs, burn fuel. When not properly exhausted, the fumes can find a home inside a vehicle vs. outside, making a driver and passenger disoriented and at risk of crashing. Common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion and the symptoms may look similar to seasickness or alcohol intoxication.

  • If you are experiencing any CO poisoning symptoms or feel you may be at risk in your vehicle due to an exhaust-related defect, please visit your doctor immediately and report the issue.
  • If you have been involved in an accident due to CO poisoning, contact an accident injury attorney at the Law Offices of Lee Steinberg.
  • To view The Center for Disease Control’s information page on Carbon Monoxide dangers, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/co/.

Contact Us Now to Discuss Your Accident Injury Case 

Vehicle defects have proven to lead to serious accidents, injuries, and sometimes death. With offices throughout Michigan, the Law Offices of Lee Steinberg are positioned to help the victims of dangerous and faulty vehicles anywhere in the state. If you or a loved one were injured because of a known or unknown vehicle defect or involved in an accident because of someone else’s recalled vehicle, please call Lee Free and speak to our expert attorneys at 1-800-LEE-FREE (1-800-533-3733).

You can also contact us by filling out our simple Free Case Evaluation Form.

By |2018-07-23T18:15:46+00:00July 18th, 2018|Michigan News, Product Liability|0 Comments

About the Author:

Eric joined the Law Offices of Lee Steinberg, P.C to fight for injury victims throughout Michigan. He has been selected to Super Lawyers and is a member of the National Trial Lawyers Top 40 Under 40. A graduate of the Chicago-Kent College of Law, he devotes 100% of his practice to representing victims who have been injured by the negligence of others. He is on the Executive Board for the Michigan Association for Justice.

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